10 Problem Solving Interview Questions To Hire the Best Candidates

You can't account for every external factor that occurs, and there won't be a single person that can solve every problem. Here, we’ll explore why problem-solving questions are crucial to your interview process and offer ten problem solving interview questions to help you hire the best candidate.

Marion Bernes
Copywriter
10 Problem Solving Interview Questions To Hire the Best Candidates
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Summary

No matter how perfect or well-thought-out a business plan sounds, unforeseen circumstances will always arise. You can't account for every external factor that occurs, and there won't be a single person that can solve every problem. For a company to be successful, you will need to hire a wide array of capable employees who can identify and resolve almost any issue. 

You'll have to employ interview problem solving questions that examine how a candidate solves problems during the interview process. Here, we’ll explore why problem solving questions are crucial to your interview process and offer ten problem solving interview questions to help you hire the best candidate.

What Are Problem Solving Interview Questions?

First, it's important to note what problem solving questions are and why they're essential.

Problem solving interview questions are thought provoking inquiries that analyze a candidate's ability to recognize unexpected complications and their process of solving them. This includes planning on multiple levels (having a plan A and a plan B), implementation, and execution. 

These types of questions specifically target an interviewee's critical thinking and creativity. By understanding how a person handles problems, you'll get a clearer idea of how they'll fit in the workplace.

Internally solving problems within a business structure is also vital to the synergy and prolonged survival of a company. If its workers can't discern or ignore problems, they will only worsen. 

You'll want to consider a prospective worker's problem-solving capabilities before hiring. 

It may be wise to research a more in-depth explanation of why problem-solving skills are critical when hiring in the workplace.

Tips For Using Problem Solving Questions To Screen Candidates

A big part of adequately gauging a candidate's abilities during the screening process is how you utilize interview questions about problem solving. 

Here are some helpful tips to optimize your interview questions for problem solving and make the most out of your time: 

Look Out For Generic Answers

Many resources help people practice interview responses by giving them generic answers to the standard problem solving interview questions based on "what employers want to hear."

You'll want to be on guard for these answers because they don't reflect a person's actual abilities and are easy to replicate. 

You'll want to ask questions drawing from a worker's personal experiences to combat this. Candidates who provide unique and genuine answers give more in-depth insights into their problem solving capacity. 

Ask Job Specific Questions

Different jobs have different problems. 

Asking a computer programmer how to treat a cramped muscle is the same as asking a fitness trainer how to solve an error in the HTML; you won't be getting any insights into their job-specific skills. 

Ask questions that are relevant to the interviewee’s potential position. Use common problems in that field and try to pertain to a specific theme. 

It's also a good idea to propose real problems at your workplace. Compare and contrast the candidate's solution to how your company resolved the issue. 

Their response may not be the same, but it could be vastly more effective than your resolution.

Ask Different Types of Problem Solving Questions

There are different categories of problems. Technical problem solving interview questions gain one perspective on a candidate’s skill set. A relationship problem solving question or a critical thinking problem solving question offers additional insight.

A technical problem might mean an error in the system or a malfunctioning piece of equipment. A candidate should be able to notice early signs of these problems (if applicable) and take action accordingly. 

They should also know when the situation is impossible for them to solve alone and that they should go to a higher authority for help.

A relationship problem is when there is a conflict between two or more employees. Teamwork is critical in some fields and a must for cumulative progress. 

HR can't resolve every little argument between workers, so it's often up to the individual to take action and compromise. 

Assessing a candidate's relationship problem solving ability is essential, especially in team-based environments. 

A critical thinking problem is a more complex problem requiring creativity and innovation to solve. 

There isn't a simple fix to these problems, and a person will have to get crafty to solve them. Management, organization, and unanticipated issues usually fall under this category and require the greatest attention to resolve. 

Give Candidates Multiple Opportunities To Relay Experiences

Keep in mind that not every exceptional employee is good at interviews. Some people panic and freeze up on the spot; it's a natural reaction.

If your screening process has multiple stages, you'll want to capitalize on this by assessing a candidate's problem solving abilities twice. There should be one time when they are asked unexpectedly and another when they have time to formulate their answer.  

By doing this, you won't miss out on highly qualified individuals who may not be the best at interviews, and you'll also get a better idea of each candidate's capabilities. 

Incorporate Team Related Problems

People cannot always solve problems on their own. A person shouldn't be entirely dependent on others, but they also have to be able to work on a team efficiently.

The way a candidate tackles team-related issues conveys their ability to get along with co-workers, leadership potential, and capacity for compromise.

People on different wavelengths are going to have other ideas and solutions. If no one can agree, then nothing is ever going to get done. You'll also have to consider a candidate's competence at evenly distributing work and versatility in the planning process. 

Yes, a person's solo problem solving capabilities are important, but their teamwork skills and communication are vital. Keep this in mind during the screening process.

Build Off of Interviewee Responses

Don't go through a repetitive hit-and-go questioning process. Once you ask a question, try to build on the candidate's response. 

This especially goes for questions that draw on a person's real-life experiences. You may have a limited time to ask your questions, but that doesn't mean you have to go through all of them.

Getting in-depth answers to a few questions will better look at a person's problem solving abilities and work ethic. 

If there's something you're curious about or something the candidate says piques your interest, speak up and try to pry as much as possible. 

10 Problem Solving Interview Questions To Hire the Best Candidate

Here are some excellent base questions to ask prospective employees. Each job is unique and encounters different issues, so you'll likely have to make some modifications to fit your case better.

Nonetheless, these are ten great problem solving interview questions that'll isolate the best candidates during the screening process:

1. What Is Your Approach To Problem Solving? 

One of the first things you'll want to assess in a candidate is their approach to solving problems. 

Using inefficient, unorganized, or reckless methods can be more detrimental than good, so be sure to comprehend a person's problem solving strategy deeply. 

Try to get them to relay the exact structure of their approach and have them explain their reasoning behind each step. Encourage your candidate to draw on past experiences and successes as well. 

The problem solving approach also includes a person's attitude towards an issue. Consider elements such as cautiousness, incentive, and reliance on external factors. 

2. How Do You Identify Potential Problems? 

Problems cannot be solved if they cannot be seen. 

Ask the candidate how they have identified different problems throughout their work and personal history. You'll also want to inquire about frequent issues in your business's workplace and common complaints. 

Don't just assess a candidate's ability to realize problems. The time it takes to identify a problem is equally important. Problems become more blatant the longer they are left untouched.

An excellent type of question to use here is a scenario question. Propose a simulated setting based on your company's environment and have them pinpoint the problem. 

3. How Do You Evaluate The Impact of Potential Problems? 

Another skill prospective employees need is the capacity for foresight. They should be able to evaluate the adverse effects of a particular issue. Otherwise, they'd be able to identify the problem but have no incentive to solve it. 

Try to ask questions relating to cause and effect. Ex: If [blank] occurs, then what will happen in the short term and the long run.

4. How Do You Prioritize Problems To Be Solved? 

A spilled drink likely won't require as much attention as a corporate-wide virus in the systems. 

Recognizing where issues lie and knowing how to distribute time can save large sums of money while avoiding catastrophic scenarios.

A candidate's prioritization of problems also indicates their decision-making and organization skills. 

To go further in-depth here, give a candidate a series of problems and have them rank them in the order in which they should be solved. 

5. How Do You Develop Solutions To Problems? 

Developing solutions is a prominent indicator of planning ability and intuitive thinking. Proposing unique problems will test an individual's creative process and reveal how flexible their logic is. 

If a person has a single set strategy for solving every problem, they'll eventually fail. You'll need to hire adaptable workers who can think outside of the box. 

There will never be a plan that accounts for everything.

You can modify this question to work with different problems, such as technical problems, relationship problems, and critical-thinking problems. Each of them necessitates a distinctive solution, so you'll inadvertently force a candidate to display their plasticity. 

6. How Do You Implement Solutions To Problems? 

Having a plan is one thing. Putting it into action is an entirely different matter. If you're familiar with the adage "easier said than done," you can probably infer the purpose of this question.

Unfortunately, you probably won't be able to test candidates firsthand on their ability to implement solutions to problems. The next best thing is closely scrutinizing their personal experiences. 

Ask about problems they have solved in the past. Inquire about what may have happened if their solution didn't work. 

For any theoretical scenarios, you propose, point out flaws in the candidate's plan of action and have them gauge the practicality of performing it.  

Be meticulous here and determine how viable their answers are. 

7. How Do You Evaluate The Effectiveness of Solutions? 

There should be multiple layers to a person's planning process. A candidate can't just propose a well-thought-out plan without evaluating its efficiency. 

The easiest or quickest solutions won't always be the most effective. Yes, simplicity and speed are crucial factors in evaluating effectiveness, but they aren't all-encompassing.

Candidates should also consider the resources used and the longevity of their solution. Identify "bandage fix" answers, and look for long-term results.

A candidate should exhibit the ability to compare the pros and cons of different solutions and determine which one will be the most effective. 

8. How Do You Learn From Problem Solving Experiences? 

Learning from past problems is essential for solving future ones.

A candidate's ability to draw from previous experiences will suggest their effectiveness at problem solving at your workplace.

You will want to hear about the successes of a candidate's problem solving endeavors and their utter failures. Have them relay their gravest mistakes and how they learned from those experiences.

Remember, while succeeding feels good, a person learns more from failure. If a candidate is confident enough to tell you about their most significant shortcoming, they've moved past it and will likely handle adversity more effectively. 

9. How Do You Handle A Situation Where a Colleague Made a Mistake?

It is almost always more comfortable to stay in your lane and mind your own business when it comes to working life. However, interacting with others is a crucial part of teamwork and creating an effective workplace environment.

This question gauges your candidate’s interpersonal skills. You would not like to hear your candidate slandering former colleagues or companies. 

Instead, a candidate's ability to exhibit diplomacy within the workplace is a far more desirable response. When people can work together well and solve problems, your business is more likely to run like a well-oiled machine.

10. How Have You Overcome Personal Weaknesses To Improve Work Performance?

When looking to gain insight into a candidate's self-awareness, this is a great leading question to get a conversation started. 

While self-awareness may seem more relevant to life outside of work, it procures growth in all aspects of a person’s life, leading to a more well-rounded employee. 

A promising candidate will be more than willing to acknowledge their weaknesses, using them as a tool to improve performance. Candidates' answer to this question will also gauge their willingness to learn and adjust to various fluid workplace elements. 

The Bottom Line

There will always be unaccounted problems in a company's business structure. There are no amount of preventive measures one can take to avoid them all; it's just not possible.

Hiring intuitive employees who can think broadly and resolve issues independently is essential to every company. This is why problem solving interview questions are so vital.

Evaluating this skill set in prospective candidates may require extra work but is ultimately worth it. 

Try this free problem solving advanced test if you're looking for a more in-depth evaluation of an applicant's problem solving abilities for your screening process.

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10 Problem Solving Interview Questions To Hire the Best Candidates

You can't account for every external factor that occurs, and there won't be a single person that can solve every problem. Here, we’ll explore why problem-solving questions are crucial to your interview process and offer ten problem solving interview questions to help you hire the best candidate.

10 Problem Solving Interview Questions To Hire the Best Candidates

No matter how perfect or well-thought-out a business plan sounds, unforeseen circumstances will always arise. You can't account for every external factor that occurs, and there won't be a single person that can solve every problem. For a company to be successful, you will need to hire a wide array of capable employees who can identify and resolve almost any issue. 

You'll have to employ interview problem solving questions that examine how a candidate solves problems during the interview process. Here, we’ll explore why problem solving questions are crucial to your interview process and offer ten problem solving interview questions to help you hire the best candidate.

What Are Problem Solving Interview Questions?

First, it's important to note what problem solving questions are and why they're essential.

Problem solving interview questions are thought provoking inquiries that analyze a candidate's ability to recognize unexpected complications and their process of solving them. This includes planning on multiple levels (having a plan A and a plan B), implementation, and execution. 

These types of questions specifically target an interviewee's critical thinking and creativity. By understanding how a person handles problems, you'll get a clearer idea of how they'll fit in the workplace.

Internally solving problems within a business structure is also vital to the synergy and prolonged survival of a company. If its workers can't discern or ignore problems, they will only worsen. 

You'll want to consider a prospective worker's problem-solving capabilities before hiring. 

It may be wise to research a more in-depth explanation of why problem-solving skills are critical when hiring in the workplace.

Tips For Using Problem Solving Questions To Screen Candidates

A big part of adequately gauging a candidate's abilities during the screening process is how you utilize interview questions about problem solving. 

Here are some helpful tips to optimize your interview questions for problem solving and make the most out of your time: 

Look Out For Generic Answers

Many resources help people practice interview responses by giving them generic answers to the standard problem solving interview questions based on "what employers want to hear."

You'll want to be on guard for these answers because they don't reflect a person's actual abilities and are easy to replicate. 

You'll want to ask questions drawing from a worker's personal experiences to combat this. Candidates who provide unique and genuine answers give more in-depth insights into their problem solving capacity. 

Ask Job Specific Questions

Different jobs have different problems. 

Asking a computer programmer how to treat a cramped muscle is the same as asking a fitness trainer how to solve an error in the HTML; you won't be getting any insights into their job-specific skills. 

Ask questions that are relevant to the interviewee’s potential position. Use common problems in that field and try to pertain to a specific theme. 

It's also a good idea to propose real problems at your workplace. Compare and contrast the candidate's solution to how your company resolved the issue. 

Their response may not be the same, but it could be vastly more effective than your resolution.

Ask Different Types of Problem Solving Questions

There are different categories of problems. Technical problem solving interview questions gain one perspective on a candidate’s skill set. A relationship problem solving question or a critical thinking problem solving question offers additional insight.

A technical problem might mean an error in the system or a malfunctioning piece of equipment. A candidate should be able to notice early signs of these problems (if applicable) and take action accordingly. 

They should also know when the situation is impossible for them to solve alone and that they should go to a higher authority for help.

A relationship problem is when there is a conflict between two or more employees. Teamwork is critical in some fields and a must for cumulative progress. 

HR can't resolve every little argument between workers, so it's often up to the individual to take action and compromise. 

Assessing a candidate's relationship problem solving ability is essential, especially in team-based environments. 

A critical thinking problem is a more complex problem requiring creativity and innovation to solve. 

There isn't a simple fix to these problems, and a person will have to get crafty to solve them. Management, organization, and unanticipated issues usually fall under this category and require the greatest attention to resolve. 

Give Candidates Multiple Opportunities To Relay Experiences

Keep in mind that not every exceptional employee is good at interviews. Some people panic and freeze up on the spot; it's a natural reaction.

If your screening process has multiple stages, you'll want to capitalize on this by assessing a candidate's problem solving abilities twice. There should be one time when they are asked unexpectedly and another when they have time to formulate their answer.  

By doing this, you won't miss out on highly qualified individuals who may not be the best at interviews, and you'll also get a better idea of each candidate's capabilities. 

Incorporate Team Related Problems

People cannot always solve problems on their own. A person shouldn't be entirely dependent on others, but they also have to be able to work on a team efficiently.

The way a candidate tackles team-related issues conveys their ability to get along with co-workers, leadership potential, and capacity for compromise.

People on different wavelengths are going to have other ideas and solutions. If no one can agree, then nothing is ever going to get done. You'll also have to consider a candidate's competence at evenly distributing work and versatility in the planning process. 

Yes, a person's solo problem solving capabilities are important, but their teamwork skills and communication are vital. Keep this in mind during the screening process.

Build Off of Interviewee Responses

Don't go through a repetitive hit-and-go questioning process. Once you ask a question, try to build on the candidate's response. 

This especially goes for questions that draw on a person's real-life experiences. You may have a limited time to ask your questions, but that doesn't mean you have to go through all of them.

Getting in-depth answers to a few questions will better look at a person's problem solving abilities and work ethic. 

If there's something you're curious about or something the candidate says piques your interest, speak up and try to pry as much as possible. 

10 Problem Solving Interview Questions To Hire the Best Candidate

Here are some excellent base questions to ask prospective employees. Each job is unique and encounters different issues, so you'll likely have to make some modifications to fit your case better.

Nonetheless, these are ten great problem solving interview questions that'll isolate the best candidates during the screening process:

1. What Is Your Approach To Problem Solving? 

One of the first things you'll want to assess in a candidate is their approach to solving problems. 

Using inefficient, unorganized, or reckless methods can be more detrimental than good, so be sure to comprehend a person's problem solving strategy deeply. 

Try to get them to relay the exact structure of their approach and have them explain their reasoning behind each step. Encourage your candidate to draw on past experiences and successes as well. 

The problem solving approach also includes a person's attitude towards an issue. Consider elements such as cautiousness, incentive, and reliance on external factors. 

2. How Do You Identify Potential Problems? 

Problems cannot be solved if they cannot be seen. 

Ask the candidate how they have identified different problems throughout their work and personal history. You'll also want to inquire about frequent issues in your business's workplace and common complaints. 

Don't just assess a candidate's ability to realize problems. The time it takes to identify a problem is equally important. Problems become more blatant the longer they are left untouched.

An excellent type of question to use here is a scenario question. Propose a simulated setting based on your company's environment and have them pinpoint the problem. 

3. How Do You Evaluate The Impact of Potential Problems? 

Another skill prospective employees need is the capacity for foresight. They should be able to evaluate the adverse effects of a particular issue. Otherwise, they'd be able to identify the problem but have no incentive to solve it. 

Try to ask questions relating to cause and effect. Ex: If [blank] occurs, then what will happen in the short term and the long run.

4. How Do You Prioritize Problems To Be Solved? 

A spilled drink likely won't require as much attention as a corporate-wide virus in the systems. 

Recognizing where issues lie and knowing how to distribute time can save large sums of money while avoiding catastrophic scenarios.

A candidate's prioritization of problems also indicates their decision-making and organization skills. 

To go further in-depth here, give a candidate a series of problems and have them rank them in the order in which they should be solved. 

5. How Do You Develop Solutions To Problems? 

Developing solutions is a prominent indicator of planning ability and intuitive thinking. Proposing unique problems will test an individual's creative process and reveal how flexible their logic is. 

If a person has a single set strategy for solving every problem, they'll eventually fail. You'll need to hire adaptable workers who can think outside of the box. 

There will never be a plan that accounts for everything.

You can modify this question to work with different problems, such as technical problems, relationship problems, and critical-thinking problems. Each of them necessitates a distinctive solution, so you'll inadvertently force a candidate to display their plasticity. 

6. How Do You Implement Solutions To Problems? 

Having a plan is one thing. Putting it into action is an entirely different matter. If you're familiar with the adage "easier said than done," you can probably infer the purpose of this question.

Unfortunately, you probably won't be able to test candidates firsthand on their ability to implement solutions to problems. The next best thing is closely scrutinizing their personal experiences. 

Ask about problems they have solved in the past. Inquire about what may have happened if their solution didn't work. 

For any theoretical scenarios, you propose, point out flaws in the candidate's plan of action and have them gauge the practicality of performing it.  

Be meticulous here and determine how viable their answers are. 

7. How Do You Evaluate The Effectiveness of Solutions? 

There should be multiple layers to a person's planning process. A candidate can't just propose a well-thought-out plan without evaluating its efficiency. 

The easiest or quickest solutions won't always be the most effective. Yes, simplicity and speed are crucial factors in evaluating effectiveness, but they aren't all-encompassing.

Candidates should also consider the resources used and the longevity of their solution. Identify "bandage fix" answers, and look for long-term results.

A candidate should exhibit the ability to compare the pros and cons of different solutions and determine which one will be the most effective. 

8. How Do You Learn From Problem Solving Experiences? 

Learning from past problems is essential for solving future ones.

A candidate's ability to draw from previous experiences will suggest their effectiveness at problem solving at your workplace.

You will want to hear about the successes of a candidate's problem solving endeavors and their utter failures. Have them relay their gravest mistakes and how they learned from those experiences.

Remember, while succeeding feels good, a person learns more from failure. If a candidate is confident enough to tell you about their most significant shortcoming, they've moved past it and will likely handle adversity more effectively. 

9. How Do You Handle A Situation Where a Colleague Made a Mistake?

It is almost always more comfortable to stay in your lane and mind your own business when it comes to working life. However, interacting with others is a crucial part of teamwork and creating an effective workplace environment.

This question gauges your candidate’s interpersonal skills. You would not like to hear your candidate slandering former colleagues or companies. 

Instead, a candidate's ability to exhibit diplomacy within the workplace is a far more desirable response. When people can work together well and solve problems, your business is more likely to run like a well-oiled machine.

10. How Have You Overcome Personal Weaknesses To Improve Work Performance?

When looking to gain insight into a candidate's self-awareness, this is a great leading question to get a conversation started. 

While self-awareness may seem more relevant to life outside of work, it procures growth in all aspects of a person’s life, leading to a more well-rounded employee. 

A promising candidate will be more than willing to acknowledge their weaknesses, using them as a tool to improve performance. Candidates' answer to this question will also gauge their willingness to learn and adjust to various fluid workplace elements. 

The Bottom Line

There will always be unaccounted problems in a company's business structure. There are no amount of preventive measures one can take to avoid them all; it's just not possible.

Hiring intuitive employees who can think broadly and resolve issues independently is essential to every company. This is why problem solving interview questions are so vital.

Evaluating this skill set in prospective candidates may require extra work but is ultimately worth it. 

Try this free problem solving advanced test if you're looking for a more in-depth evaluation of an applicant's problem solving abilities for your screening process.

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Marion Bernes

Marion Bernes
Copywriter

10 Problem Solving Interview Questions To Hire the Best Candidates

   Changelog.   

Summary
Summary

No matter how perfect or well-thought-out a business plan sounds, unforeseen circumstances will always arise. You can't account for every external factor that occurs, and there won't be a single person that can solve every problem. For a company to be successful, you will need to hire a wide array of capable employees who can identify and resolve almost any issue. 

You'll have to employ interview problem solving questions that examine how a candidate solves problems during the interview process. Here, we’ll explore why problem solving questions are crucial to your interview process and offer ten problem solving interview questions to help you hire the best candidate.

What Are Problem Solving Interview Questions?

First, it's important to note what problem solving questions are and why they're essential.

Problem solving interview questions are thought provoking inquiries that analyze a candidate's ability to recognize unexpected complications and their process of solving them. This includes planning on multiple levels (having a plan A and a plan B), implementation, and execution. 

These types of questions specifically target an interviewee's critical thinking and creativity. By understanding how a person handles problems, you'll get a clearer idea of how they'll fit in the workplace.

Internally solving problems within a business structure is also vital to the synergy and prolonged survival of a company. If its workers can't discern or ignore problems, they will only worsen. 

You'll want to consider a prospective worker's problem-solving capabilities before hiring. 

It may be wise to research a more in-depth explanation of why problem-solving skills are critical when hiring in the workplace.

Tips For Using Problem Solving Questions To Screen Candidates

A big part of adequately gauging a candidate's abilities during the screening process is how you utilize interview questions about problem solving. 

Here are some helpful tips to optimize your interview questions for problem solving and make the most out of your time: 

Look Out For Generic Answers

Many resources help people practice interview responses by giving them generic answers to the standard problem solving interview questions based on "what employers want to hear."

You'll want to be on guard for these answers because they don't reflect a person's actual abilities and are easy to replicate. 

You'll want to ask questions drawing from a worker's personal experiences to combat this. Candidates who provide unique and genuine answers give more in-depth insights into their problem solving capacity. 

Ask Job Specific Questions

Different jobs have different problems. 

Asking a computer programmer how to treat a cramped muscle is the same as asking a fitness trainer how to solve an error in the HTML; you won't be getting any insights into their job-specific skills. 

Ask questions that are relevant to the interviewee’s potential position. Use common problems in that field and try to pertain to a specific theme. 

It's also a good idea to propose real problems at your workplace. Compare and contrast the candidate's solution to how your company resolved the issue. 

Their response may not be the same, but it could be vastly more effective than your resolution.

Ask Different Types of Problem Solving Questions

There are different categories of problems. Technical problem solving interview questions gain one perspective on a candidate’s skill set. A relationship problem solving question or a critical thinking problem solving question offers additional insight.

A technical problem might mean an error in the system or a malfunctioning piece of equipment. A candidate should be able to notice early signs of these problems (if applicable) and take action accordingly. 

They should also know when the situation is impossible for them to solve alone and that they should go to a higher authority for help.

A relationship problem is when there is a conflict between two or more employees. Teamwork is critical in some fields and a must for cumulative progress. 

HR can't resolve every little argument between workers, so it's often up to the individual to take action and compromise. 

Assessing a candidate's relationship problem solving ability is essential, especially in team-based environments. 

A critical thinking problem is a more complex problem requiring creativity and innovation to solve. 

There isn't a simple fix to these problems, and a person will have to get crafty to solve them. Management, organization, and unanticipated issues usually fall under this category and require the greatest attention to resolve. 

Give Candidates Multiple Opportunities To Relay Experiences

Keep in mind that not every exceptional employee is good at interviews. Some people panic and freeze up on the spot; it's a natural reaction.

If your screening process has multiple stages, you'll want to capitalize on this by assessing a candidate's problem solving abilities twice. There should be one time when they are asked unexpectedly and another when they have time to formulate their answer.  

By doing this, you won't miss out on highly qualified individuals who may not be the best at interviews, and you'll also get a better idea of each candidate's capabilities. 

Incorporate Team Related Problems

People cannot always solve problems on their own. A person shouldn't be entirely dependent on others, but they also have to be able to work on a team efficiently.

The way a candidate tackles team-related issues conveys their ability to get along with co-workers, leadership potential, and capacity for compromise.

People on different wavelengths are going to have other ideas and solutions. If no one can agree, then nothing is ever going to get done. You'll also have to consider a candidate's competence at evenly distributing work and versatility in the planning process. 

Yes, a person's solo problem solving capabilities are important, but their teamwork skills and communication are vital. Keep this in mind during the screening process.

Build Off of Interviewee Responses

Don't go through a repetitive hit-and-go questioning process. Once you ask a question, try to build on the candidate's response. 

This especially goes for questions that draw on a person's real-life experiences. You may have a limited time to ask your questions, but that doesn't mean you have to go through all of them.

Getting in-depth answers to a few questions will better look at a person's problem solving abilities and work ethic. 

If there's something you're curious about or something the candidate says piques your interest, speak up and try to pry as much as possible. 

10 Problem Solving Interview Questions To Hire the Best Candidate

Here are some excellent base questions to ask prospective employees. Each job is unique and encounters different issues, so you'll likely have to make some modifications to fit your case better.

Nonetheless, these are ten great problem solving interview questions that'll isolate the best candidates during the screening process:

1. What Is Your Approach To Problem Solving? 

One of the first things you'll want to assess in a candidate is their approach to solving problems. 

Using inefficient, unorganized, or reckless methods can be more detrimental than good, so be sure to comprehend a person's problem solving strategy deeply. 

Try to get them to relay the exact structure of their approach and have them explain their reasoning behind each step. Encourage your candidate to draw on past experiences and successes as well. 

The problem solving approach also includes a person's attitude towards an issue. Consider elements such as cautiousness, incentive, and reliance on external factors. 

2. How Do You Identify Potential Problems? 

Problems cannot be solved if they cannot be seen. 

Ask the candidate how they have identified different problems throughout their work and personal history. You'll also want to inquire about frequent issues in your business's workplace and common complaints. 

Don't just assess a candidate's ability to realize problems. The time it takes to identify a problem is equally important. Problems become more blatant the longer they are left untouched.

An excellent type of question to use here is a scenario question. Propose a simulated setting based on your company's environment and have them pinpoint the problem. 

3. How Do You Evaluate The Impact of Potential Problems? 

Another skill prospective employees need is the capacity for foresight. They should be able to evaluate the adverse effects of a particular issue. Otherwise, they'd be able to identify the problem but have no incentive to solve it. 

Try to ask questions relating to cause and effect. Ex: If [blank] occurs, then what will happen in the short term and the long run.

4. How Do You Prioritize Problems To Be Solved? 

A spilled drink likely won't require as much attention as a corporate-wide virus in the systems. 

Recognizing where issues lie and knowing how to distribute time can save large sums of money while avoiding catastrophic scenarios.

A candidate's prioritization of problems also indicates their decision-making and organization skills. 

To go further in-depth here, give a candidate a series of problems and have them rank them in the order in which they should be solved. 

5. How Do You Develop Solutions To Problems? 

Developing solutions is a prominent indicator of planning ability and intuitive thinking. Proposing unique problems will test an individual's creative process and reveal how flexible their logic is. 

If a person has a single set strategy for solving every problem, they'll eventually fail. You'll need to hire adaptable workers who can think outside of the box. 

There will never be a plan that accounts for everything.

You can modify this question to work with different problems, such as technical problems, relationship problems, and critical-thinking problems. Each of them necessitates a distinctive solution, so you'll inadvertently force a candidate to display their plasticity. 

6. How Do You Implement Solutions To Problems? 

Having a plan is one thing. Putting it into action is an entirely different matter. If you're familiar with the adage "easier said than done," you can probably infer the purpose of this question.

Unfortunately, you probably won't be able to test candidates firsthand on their ability to implement solutions to problems. The next best thing is closely scrutinizing their personal experiences. 

Ask about problems they have solved in the past. Inquire about what may have happened if their solution didn't work. 

For any theoretical scenarios, you propose, point out flaws in the candidate's plan of action and have them gauge the practicality of performing it.  

Be meticulous here and determine how viable their answers are. 

7. How Do You Evaluate The Effectiveness of Solutions? 

There should be multiple layers to a person's planning process. A candidate can't just propose a well-thought-out plan without evaluating its efficiency. 

The easiest or quickest solutions won't always be the most effective. Yes, simplicity and speed are crucial factors in evaluating effectiveness, but they aren't all-encompassing.

Candidates should also consider the resources used and the longevity of their solution. Identify "bandage fix" answers, and look for long-term results.

A candidate should exhibit the ability to compare the pros and cons of different solutions and determine which one will be the most effective. 

8. How Do You Learn From Problem Solving Experiences? 

Learning from past problems is essential for solving future ones.

A candidate's ability to draw from previous experiences will suggest their effectiveness at problem solving at your workplace.

You will want to hear about the successes of a candidate's problem solving endeavors and their utter failures. Have them relay their gravest mistakes and how they learned from those experiences.

Remember, while succeeding feels good, a person learns more from failure. If a candidate is confident enough to tell you about their most significant shortcoming, they've moved past it and will likely handle adversity more effectively. 

9. How Do You Handle A Situation Where a Colleague Made a Mistake?

It is almost always more comfortable to stay in your lane and mind your own business when it comes to working life. However, interacting with others is a crucial part of teamwork and creating an effective workplace environment.

This question gauges your candidate’s interpersonal skills. You would not like to hear your candidate slandering former colleagues or companies. 

Instead, a candidate's ability to exhibit diplomacy within the workplace is a far more desirable response. When people can work together well and solve problems, your business is more likely to run like a well-oiled machine.

10. How Have You Overcome Personal Weaknesses To Improve Work Performance?

When looking to gain insight into a candidate's self-awareness, this is a great leading question to get a conversation started. 

While self-awareness may seem more relevant to life outside of work, it procures growth in all aspects of a person’s life, leading to a more well-rounded employee. 

A promising candidate will be more than willing to acknowledge their weaknesses, using them as a tool to improve performance. Candidates' answer to this question will also gauge their willingness to learn and adjust to various fluid workplace elements. 

The Bottom Line

There will always be unaccounted problems in a company's business structure. There are no amount of preventive measures one can take to avoid them all; it's just not possible.

Hiring intuitive employees who can think broadly and resolve issues independently is essential to every company. This is why problem solving interview questions are so vital.

Evaluating this skill set in prospective candidates may require extra work but is ultimately worth it. 

Try this free problem solving advanced test if you're looking for a more in-depth evaluation of an applicant's problem solving abilities for your screening process.

No matter how perfect or well-thought-out a business plan sounds, unforeseen circumstances will always arise. You can't account for every external factor that occurs, and there won't be a single person that can solve every problem. For a company to be successful, you will need to hire a wide array of capable employees who can identify and resolve almost any issue. 

You'll have to employ interview problem solving questions that examine how a candidate solves problems during the interview process. Here, we’ll explore why problem solving questions are crucial to your interview process and offer ten problem solving interview questions to help you hire the best candidate.

What Are Problem Solving Interview Questions?

First, it's important to note what problem solving questions are and why they're essential.

Problem solving interview questions are thought provoking inquiries that analyze a candidate's ability to recognize unexpected complications and their process of solving them. This includes planning on multiple levels (having a plan A and a plan B), implementation, and execution. 

These types of questions specifically target an interviewee's critical thinking and creativity. By understanding how a person handles problems, you'll get a clearer idea of how they'll fit in the workplace.

Internally solving problems within a business structure is also vital to the synergy and prolonged survival of a company. If its workers can't discern or ignore problems, they will only worsen. 

You'll want to consider a prospective worker's problem-solving capabilities before hiring. 

It may be wise to research a more in-depth explanation of why problem-solving skills are critical when hiring in the workplace.

Tips For Using Problem Solving Questions To Screen Candidates

A big part of adequately gauging a candidate's abilities during the screening process is how you utilize interview questions about problem solving. 

Here are some helpful tips to optimize your interview questions for problem solving and make the most out of your time: 

Look Out For Generic Answers

Many resources help people practice interview responses by giving them generic answers to the standard problem solving interview questions based on "what employers want to hear."

You'll want to be on guard for these answers because they don't reflect a person's actual abilities and are easy to replicate. 

You'll want to ask questions drawing from a worker's personal experiences to combat this. Candidates who provide unique and genuine answers give more in-depth insights into their problem solving capacity. 

Ask Job Specific Questions

Different jobs have different problems. 

Asking a computer programmer how to treat a cramped muscle is the same as asking a fitness trainer how to solve an error in the HTML; you won't be getting any insights into their job-specific skills. 

Ask questions that are relevant to the interviewee’s potential position. Use common problems in that field and try to pertain to a specific theme. 

It's also a good idea to propose real problems at your workplace. Compare and contrast the candidate's solution to how your company resolved the issue. 

Their response may not be the same, but it could be vastly more effective than your resolution.

Ask Different Types of Problem Solving Questions

There are different categories of problems. Technical problem solving interview questions gain one perspective on a candidate’s skill set. A relationship problem solving question or a critical thinking problem solving question offers additional insight.

A technical problem might mean an error in the system or a malfunctioning piece of equipment. A candidate should be able to notice early signs of these problems (if applicable) and take action accordingly. 

They should also know when the situation is impossible for them to solve alone and that they should go to a higher authority for help.

A relationship problem is when there is a conflict between two or more employees. Teamwork is critical in some fields and a must for cumulative progress. 

HR can't resolve every little argument between workers, so it's often up to the individual to take action and compromise. 

Assessing a candidate's relationship problem solving ability is essential, especially in team-based environments. 

A critical thinking problem is a more complex problem requiring creativity and innovation to solve. 

There isn't a simple fix to these problems, and a person will have to get crafty to solve them. Management, organization, and unanticipated issues usually fall under this category and require the greatest attention to resolve. 

Give Candidates Multiple Opportunities To Relay Experiences

Keep in mind that not every exceptional employee is good at interviews. Some people panic and freeze up on the spot; it's a natural reaction.

If your screening process has multiple stages, you'll want to capitalize on this by assessing a candidate's problem solving abilities twice. There should be one time when they are asked unexpectedly and another when they have time to formulate their answer.  

By doing this, you won't miss out on highly qualified individuals who may not be the best at interviews, and you'll also get a better idea of each candidate's capabilities. 

Incorporate Team Related Problems

People cannot always solve problems on their own. A person shouldn't be entirely dependent on others, but they also have to be able to work on a team efficiently.

The way a candidate tackles team-related issues conveys their ability to get along with co-workers, leadership potential, and capacity for compromise.

People on different wavelengths are going to have other ideas and solutions. If no one can agree, then nothing is ever going to get done. You'll also have to consider a candidate's competence at evenly distributing work and versatility in the planning process. 

Yes, a person's solo problem solving capabilities are important, but their teamwork skills and communication are vital. Keep this in mind during the screening process.

Build Off of Interviewee Responses

Don't go through a repetitive hit-and-go questioning process. Once you ask a question, try to build on the candidate's response. 

This especially goes for questions that draw on a person's real-life experiences. You may have a limited time to ask your questions, but that doesn't mean you have to go through all of them.

Getting in-depth answers to a few questions will better look at a person's problem solving abilities and work ethic. 

If there's something you're curious about or something the candidate says piques your interest, speak up and try to pry as much as possible. 

10 Problem Solving Interview Questions To Hire the Best Candidate

Here are some excellent base questions to ask prospective employees. Each job is unique and encounters different issues, so you'll likely have to make some modifications to fit your case better.

Nonetheless, these are ten great problem solving interview questions that'll isolate the best candidates during the screening process:

1. What Is Your Approach To Problem Solving? 

One of the first things you'll want to assess in a candidate is their approach to solving problems. 

Using inefficient, unorganized, or reckless methods can be more detrimental than good, so be sure to comprehend a person's problem solving strategy deeply. 

Try to get them to relay the exact structure of their approach and have them explain their reasoning behind each step. Encourage your candidate to draw on past experiences and successes as well. 

The problem solving approach also includes a person's attitude towards an issue. Consider elements such as cautiousness, incentive, and reliance on external factors. 

2. How Do You Identify Potential Problems? 

Problems cannot be solved if they cannot be seen. 

Ask the candidate how they have identified different problems throughout their work and personal history. You'll also want to inquire about frequent issues in your business's workplace and common complaints. 

Don't just assess a candidate's ability to realize problems. The time it takes to identify a problem is equally important. Problems become more blatant the longer they are left untouched.

An excellent type of question to use here is a scenario question. Propose a simulated setting based on your company's environment and have them pinpoint the problem. 

3. How Do You Evaluate The Impact of Potential Problems? 

Another skill prospective employees need is the capacity for foresight. They should be able to evaluate the adverse effects of a particular issue. Otherwise, they'd be able to identify the problem but have no incentive to solve it. 

Try to ask questions relating to cause and effect. Ex: If [blank] occurs, then what will happen in the short term and the long run.

4. How Do You Prioritize Problems To Be Solved? 

A spilled drink likely won't require as much attention as a corporate-wide virus in the systems. 

Recognizing where issues lie and knowing how to distribute time can save large sums of money while avoiding catastrophic scenarios.

A candidate's prioritization of problems also indicates their decision-making and organization skills. 

To go further in-depth here, give a candidate a series of problems and have them rank them in the order in which they should be solved. 

5. How Do You Develop Solutions To Problems? 

Developing solutions is a prominent indicator of planning ability and intuitive thinking. Proposing unique problems will test an individual's creative process and reveal how flexible their logic is. 

If a person has a single set strategy for solving every problem, they'll eventually fail. You'll need to hire adaptable workers who can think outside of the box. 

There will never be a plan that accounts for everything.

You can modify this question to work with different problems, such as technical problems, relationship problems, and critical-thinking problems. Each of them necessitates a distinctive solution, so you'll inadvertently force a candidate to display their plasticity. 

6. How Do You Implement Solutions To Problems? 

Having a plan is one thing. Putting it into action is an entirely different matter. If you're familiar with the adage "easier said than done," you can probably infer the purpose of this question.

Unfortunately, you probably won't be able to test candidates firsthand on their ability to implement solutions to problems. The next best thing is closely scrutinizing their personal experiences. 

Ask about problems they have solved in the past. Inquire about what may have happened if their solution didn't work. 

For any theoretical scenarios, you propose, point out flaws in the candidate's plan of action and have them gauge the practicality of performing it.  

Be meticulous here and determine how viable their answers are. 

7. How Do You Evaluate The Effectiveness of Solutions? 

There should be multiple layers to a person's planning process. A candidate can't just propose a well-thought-out plan without evaluating its efficiency. 

The easiest or quickest solutions won't always be the most effective. Yes, simplicity and speed are crucial factors in evaluating effectiveness, but they aren't all-encompassing.

Candidates should also consider the resources used and the longevity of their solution. Identify "bandage fix" answers, and look for long-term results.

A candidate should exhibit the ability to compare the pros and cons of different solutions and determine which one will be the most effective. 

8. How Do You Learn From Problem Solving Experiences? 

Learning from past problems is essential for solving future ones.

A candidate's ability to draw from previous experiences will suggest their effectiveness at problem solving at your workplace.

You will want to hear about the successes of a candidate's problem solving endeavors and their utter failures. Have them relay their gravest mistakes and how they learned from those experiences.

Remember, while succeeding feels good, a person learns more from failure. If a candidate is confident enough to tell you about their most significant shortcoming, they've moved past it and will likely handle adversity more effectively. 

9. How Do You Handle A Situation Where a Colleague Made a Mistake?

It is almost always more comfortable to stay in your lane and mind your own business when it comes to working life. However, interacting with others is a crucial part of teamwork and creating an effective workplace environment.

This question gauges your candidate’s interpersonal skills. You would not like to hear your candidate slandering former colleagues or companies. 

Instead, a candidate's ability to exhibit diplomacy within the workplace is a far more desirable response. When people can work together well and solve problems, your business is more likely to run like a well-oiled machine.

10. How Have You Overcome Personal Weaknesses To Improve Work Performance?

When looking to gain insight into a candidate's self-awareness, this is a great leading question to get a conversation started. 

While self-awareness may seem more relevant to life outside of work, it procures growth in all aspects of a person’s life, leading to a more well-rounded employee. 

A promising candidate will be more than willing to acknowledge their weaknesses, using them as a tool to improve performance. Candidates' answer to this question will also gauge their willingness to learn and adjust to various fluid workplace elements. 

The Bottom Line

There will always be unaccounted problems in a company's business structure. There are no amount of preventive measures one can take to avoid them all; it's just not possible.

Hiring intuitive employees who can think broadly and resolve issues independently is essential to every company. This is why problem solving interview questions are so vital.

Evaluating this skill set in prospective candidates may require extra work but is ultimately worth it. 

Try this free problem solving advanced test if you're looking for a more in-depth evaluation of an applicant's problem solving abilities for your screening process.

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Case study

You can't account for every external factor that occurs, and there won't be a single person that can solve every problem. Here, we’ll explore why problem-solving questions are crucial to your interview process and offer ten problem solving interview questions to help you hire the best candidate.

 @
HR objective :

This is some text inside of a div block.

No matter how perfect or well-thought-out a business plan sounds, unforeseen circumstances will always arise. You can't account for every external factor that occurs, and there won't be a single person that can solve every problem. For a company to be successful, you will need to hire a wide array of capable employees who can identify and resolve almost any issue. 

You'll have to employ interview problem solving questions that examine how a candidate solves problems during the interview process. Here, we’ll explore why problem solving questions are crucial to your interview process and offer ten problem solving interview questions to help you hire the best candidate.

What Are Problem Solving Interview Questions?

First, it's important to note what problem solving questions are and why they're essential.

Problem solving interview questions are thought provoking inquiries that analyze a candidate's ability to recognize unexpected complications and their process of solving them. This includes planning on multiple levels (having a plan A and a plan B), implementation, and execution. 

These types of questions specifically target an interviewee's critical thinking and creativity. By understanding how a person handles problems, you'll get a clearer idea of how they'll fit in the workplace.

Internally solving problems within a business structure is also vital to the synergy and prolonged survival of a company. If its workers can't discern or ignore problems, they will only worsen. 

You'll want to consider a prospective worker's problem-solving capabilities before hiring. 

It may be wise to research a more in-depth explanation of why problem-solving skills are critical when hiring in the workplace.

Tips For Using Problem Solving Questions To Screen Candidates

A big part of adequately gauging a candidate's abilities during the screening process is how you utilize interview questions about problem solving. 

Here are some helpful tips to optimize your interview questions for problem solving and make the most out of your time: 

Look Out For Generic Answers

Many resources help people practice interview responses by giving them generic answers to the standard problem solving interview questions based on "what employers want to hear."

You'll want to be on guard for these answers because they don't reflect a person's actual abilities and are easy to replicate. 

You'll want to ask questions drawing from a worker's personal experiences to combat this. Candidates who provide unique and genuine answers give more in-depth insights into their problem solving capacity. 

Ask Job Specific Questions

Different jobs have different problems. 

Asking a computer programmer how to treat a cramped muscle is the same as asking a fitness trainer how to solve an error in the HTML; you won't be getting any insights into their job-specific skills. 

Ask questions that are relevant to the interviewee’s potential position. Use common problems in that field and try to pertain to a specific theme. 

It's also a good idea to propose real problems at your workplace. Compare and contrast the candidate's solution to how your company resolved the issue. 

Their response may not be the same, but it could be vastly more effective than your resolution.

Ask Different Types of Problem Solving Questions

There are different categories of problems. Technical problem solving interview questions gain one perspective on a candidate’s skill set. A relationship problem solving question or a critical thinking problem solving question offers additional insight.

A technical problem might mean an error in the system or a malfunctioning piece of equipment. A candidate should be able to notice early signs of these problems (if applicable) and take action accordingly. 

They should also know when the situation is impossible for them to solve alone and that they should go to a higher authority for help.

A relationship problem is when there is a conflict between two or more employees. Teamwork is critical in some fields and a must for cumulative progress. 

HR can't resolve every little argument between workers, so it's often up to the individual to take action and compromise. 

Assessing a candidate's relationship problem solving ability is essential, especially in team-based environments. 

A critical thinking problem is a more complex problem requiring creativity and innovation to solve. 

There isn't a simple fix to these problems, and a person will have to get crafty to solve them. Management, organization, and unanticipated issues usually fall under this category and require the greatest attention to resolve. 

Give Candidates Multiple Opportunities To Relay Experiences

Keep in mind that not every exceptional employee is good at interviews. Some people panic and freeze up on the spot; it's a natural reaction.

If your screening process has multiple stages, you'll want to capitalize on this by assessing a candidate's problem solving abilities twice. There should be one time when they are asked unexpectedly and another when they have time to formulate their answer.  

By doing this, you won't miss out on highly qualified individuals who may not be the best at interviews, and you'll also get a better idea of each candidate's capabilities. 

Incorporate Team Related Problems

People cannot always solve problems on their own. A person shouldn't be entirely dependent on others, but they also have to be able to work on a team efficiently.

The way a candidate tackles team-related issues conveys their ability to get along with co-workers, leadership potential, and capacity for compromise.

People on different wavelengths are going to have other ideas and solutions. If no one can agree, then nothing is ever going to get done. You'll also have to consider a candidate's competence at evenly distributing work and versatility in the planning process. 

Yes, a person's solo problem solving capabilities are important, but their teamwork skills and communication are vital. Keep this in mind during the screening process.

Build Off of Interviewee Responses

Don't go through a repetitive hit-and-go questioning process. Once you ask a question, try to build on the candidate's response. 

This especially goes for questions that draw on a person's real-life experiences. You may have a limited time to ask your questions, but that doesn't mean you have to go through all of them.

Getting in-depth answers to a few questions will better look at a person's problem solving abilities and work ethic. 

If there's something you're curious about or something the candidate says piques your interest, speak up and try to pry as much as possible. 

10 Problem Solving Interview Questions To Hire the Best Candidate

Here are some excellent base questions to ask prospective employees. Each job is unique and encounters different issues, so you'll likely have to make some modifications to fit your case better.

Nonetheless, these are ten great problem solving interview questions that'll isolate the best candidates during the screening process:

1. What Is Your Approach To Problem Solving? 

One of the first things you'll want to assess in a candidate is their approach to solving problems. 

Using inefficient, unorganized, or reckless methods can be more detrimental than good, so be sure to comprehend a person's problem solving strategy deeply. 

Try to get them to relay the exact structure of their approach and have them explain their reasoning behind each step. Encourage your candidate to draw on past experiences and successes as well. 

The problem solving approach also includes a person's attitude towards an issue. Consider elements such as cautiousness, incentive, and reliance on external factors. 

2. How Do You Identify Potential Problems? 

Problems cannot be solved if they cannot be seen. 

Ask the candidate how they have identified different problems throughout their work and personal history. You'll also want to inquire about frequent issues in your business's workplace and common complaints. 

Don't just assess a candidate's ability to realize problems. The time it takes to identify a problem is equally important. Problems become more blatant the longer they are left untouched.

An excellent type of question to use here is a scenario question. Propose a simulated setting based on your company's environment and have them pinpoint the problem. 

3. How Do You Evaluate The Impact of Potential Problems? 

Another skill prospective employees need is the capacity for foresight. They should be able to evaluate the adverse effects of a particular issue. Otherwise, they'd be able to identify the problem but have no incentive to solve it. 

Try to ask questions relating to cause and effect. Ex: If [blank] occurs, then what will happen in the short term and the long run.

4. How Do You Prioritize Problems To Be Solved? 

A spilled drink likely won't require as much attention as a corporate-wide virus in the systems. 

Recognizing where issues lie and knowing how to distribute time can save large sums of money while avoiding catastrophic scenarios.

A candidate's prioritization of problems also indicates their decision-making and organization skills. 

To go further in-depth here, give a candidate a series of problems and have them rank them in the order in which they should be solved. 

5. How Do You Develop Solutions To Problems? 

Developing solutions is a prominent indicator of planning ability and intuitive thinking. Proposing unique problems will test an individual's creative process and reveal how flexible their logic is. 

If a person has a single set strategy for solving every problem, they'll eventually fail. You'll need to hire adaptable workers who can think outside of the box. 

There will never be a plan that accounts for everything.

You can modify this question to work with different problems, such as technical problems, relationship problems, and critical-thinking problems. Each of them necessitates a distinctive solution, so you'll inadvertently force a candidate to display their plasticity. 

6. How Do You Implement Solutions To Problems? 

Having a plan is one thing. Putting it into action is an entirely different matter. If you're familiar with the adage "easier said than done," you can probably infer the purpose of this question.

Unfortunately, you probably won't be able to test candidates firsthand on their ability to implement solutions to problems. The next best thing is closely scrutinizing their personal experiences. 

Ask about problems they have solved in the past. Inquire about what may have happened if their solution didn't work. 

For any theoretical scenarios, you propose, point out flaws in the candidate's plan of action and have them gauge the practicality of performing it.  

Be meticulous here and determine how viable their answers are. 

7. How Do You Evaluate The Effectiveness of Solutions? 

There should be multiple layers to a person's planning process. A candidate can't just propose a well-thought-out plan without evaluating its efficiency. 

The easiest or quickest solutions won't always be the most effective. Yes, simplicity and speed are crucial factors in evaluating effectiveness, but they aren't all-encompassing.

Candidates should also consider the resources used and the longevity of their solution. Identify "bandage fix" answers, and look for long-term results.

A candidate should exhibit the ability to compare the pros and cons of different solutions and determine which one will be the most effective. 

8. How Do You Learn From Problem Solving Experiences? 

Learning from past problems is essential for solving future ones.

A candidate's ability to draw from previous experiences will suggest their effectiveness at problem solving at your workplace.

You will want to hear about the successes of a candidate's problem solving endeavors and their utter failures. Have them relay their gravest mistakes and how they learned from those experiences.

Remember, while succeeding feels good, a person learns more from failure. If a candidate is confident enough to tell you about their most significant shortcoming, they've moved past it and will likely handle adversity more effectively. 

9. How Do You Handle A Situation Where a Colleague Made a Mistake?

It is almost always more comfortable to stay in your lane and mind your own business when it comes to working life. However, interacting with others is a crucial part of teamwork and creating an effective workplace environment.

This question gauges your candidate’s interpersonal skills. You would not like to hear your candidate slandering former colleagues or companies. 

Instead, a candidate's ability to exhibit diplomacy within the workplace is a far more desirable response. When people can work together well and solve problems, your business is more likely to run like a well-oiled machine.

10. How Have You Overcome Personal Weaknesses To Improve Work Performance?

When looking to gain insight into a candidate's self-awareness, this is a great leading question to get a conversation started. 

While self-awareness may seem more relevant to life outside of work, it procures growth in all aspects of a person’s life, leading to a more well-rounded employee. 

A promising candidate will be more than willing to acknowledge their weaknesses, using them as a tool to improve performance. Candidates' answer to this question will also gauge their willingness to learn and adjust to various fluid workplace elements. 

The Bottom Line

There will always be unaccounted problems in a company's business structure. There are no amount of preventive measures one can take to avoid them all; it's just not possible.

Hiring intuitive employees who can think broadly and resolve issues independently is essential to every company. This is why problem solving interview questions are so vital.

Evaluating this skill set in prospective candidates may require extra work but is ultimately worth it. 

Try this free problem solving advanced test if you're looking for a more in-depth evaluation of an applicant's problem solving abilities for your screening process.

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